Why a Dehydrated Person Might Not Get Thirsty

9 March 2016, 12:00 am
Published in Blog

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY PETE EGOSCUE AND ORIGINALLY APPEARED ON SONIMA.COM

A great majority of my clients are chronically dehydrated, and I suspect most Americans are, too. However, when I ask my clients how much water they drink during the day, they tell me not much. When I ask them why not, they all have the same answer: “I’m not thirsty.”

How can a chronically dehydrated person not be thirsty? It doesn’t make sense. True, it doesn’t make sense, but there is a reason.

First, let’s define what exactly dehydration is. It’s all about the cells. Our cells need water in order for our bodies to function, and that water needs to be continuously replaced. In much the same way that our bodies absorb water then excrete waste in the form of urine, our cells absorb fresh water and excrete waste fluid, and that waste is then disposed through various means, including urination, sweating and even breathing. Moist breath anyone?

When those cells don’t get the fresh water they need, we’re dehydrated, and the body lets us know it needs water through the thirst mechanism. However, that thirst mechanism has been hampered in many of us. Basically, we’ve lost it because we’ve misplaced the gift of metabolic balance in our bodies. The human body is a motion machine. Through our sedentary lifestyles, we’ve reduced so much of our motion that we’ve compromised our alignment and altered our cellular energy, and one result is a hindered thirst function.

So if we’re not thirsty, how do we know we’re dehydrated? Well, the body has other ways of telling us. For instance, our urine picks up a pronounced odor and a dark, yellow color. Or the skin gets drier and requires more lotion. Or we experience energy swings and, believe it or not, insomnia. Researchers are beginning to observe that there is possibly a hydration component to insomnia (which may seem counter-intuitive to those of us over fifty who have to keep getting up to go to the bathroom through the night, but more on that in another article). Another indicator in women is that their hair becomes brittle and harder to manage.

These are subtle indications, but the indicator can become obvious, painfully obvious, when the dehydrated person participates in strenuous physical activity because she will inevitably experience a cramp. Muscle activity produces lactic acid which permeates the cells, and when there’s not enough water to flush out that lactic acid, the cells simply retain it, and it hurts. We see this result often with athletes late in a game, but the truth is they were essentially dehydrated before the game ever started. It just took heightened mobility and activity to generate the painful results of heightened dehydration.

So how do we solve this problem? Some experts say to drink more water, but that usually doesn’t work because it quickly grows uncomfortable. Since the cells have shut off that thirst mechanism, they’re tenaciously retaining the old fluid, so the water that enters the body just sits in the stomach rather than being absorbed by the cells throughout the body.

Here’s a plan I’ve found successful with clients throughout the years to restore that automatic thirst response. Get one of those small, Dixie paper cups, or a shot glass. Fill that cup up with water and drink three to five shots in quick succession, one right after the other. Wait 30 minutes then do that again. Do that in the morning and in the evening, and by the second day, you’ll probably start noticing your mouth getting dry more frequently throughout the day. Do that routine for a week, and your thirst mechanism should be in full functioning order.

On a quick side note regarding thirst and dehydration, those brilliantly-marketed sports drinks are not the answer. They are full of sugar and are a disaster for our bodies, especially among our children.

Everybody’s need for water is different based upon what they eat and what they do throughout the day. For instance, the day laborer needs more water than the office worker, obviously, and the airline pilots and stewards, because of the altitude of their occupations, need more water than the bus drivers. But no matter what you eat or what you do or how much of it you do, your body will tell you how much water it needs once you get that thirst mechanism back into proper functioning form.

Known as the Father of Postural Therapy, Pete Egoscue has helped relieve thousands of people from their chronic pain, including many of the world’s leading athletes. For more information on Pete and any of his 25 clinics worldwide, go to egoscue.com.

As always, thanks for sharing our articles (it's easy...just click below!). If you have specific questions about your health or pain, contact us today! And, don't forget to join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter!

The Top-5 Posts of 2015

16 December 2015, 12:00 am
Published in Blog

First of all, let me say a huge THANK YOU to all of our blog readers and subscribers! We have had nearly 1,500 of you subscribe, and we've only had the blog fully up and running since April! If you haven't subscribed yet, what are you waiting for? And, don't forget to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. You can also follow Pete Egoscue on Twitter!

This week's post is a year-in-review, and I'm revisiting the Top-5 posts of 2015. In case you missed any of them, here they are! Enjoy!

 

5. There's No Such Thing as a Tommy John Epidemic

If you know me at all, then you know that I’m a baseball fan. I grew up playing the game as a kid, continued playing at Yale University, and now have the honor of coaching my two oldest boys as they learn to play the game.

But lately, I’ve noticed something very alarming about the game I love. There is an increasing number of elbow injuries popping up throughout the game. From Little League to the Major Leagues, players, and specifically pitchers, are going down with elbow injuries.

The diagnosis is almost always the same: A torn ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) in the player’s elbow.

The blame is almost always the same: Too many pitches thrown in a season, or throwing a curve ball at too young of an age, or too many innings pitched in a year, etc.

The solution is almost always the same: Reconstructive surgery (also known as Tommy John Surgery, named after the player who first had the procedure done).

Yet the cause is almost always missed:

- See more at: http://egoscue.com/blog/item/65-no-tommy-john-epidemic-egoscue#sthash.4aYgAGr1.dpuf

If you know me at all, then you know that I’m a baseball fan. I grew up playing the game as a kid, continued playing at Yale University, and now have the honor of coaching my two oldest boys as they learn to play the game.

But lately, I’ve noticed something very alarming about the game I love. There is an increasing number of elbow injuries popping up throughout the game. From Little League to the Major Leagues, players, and specifically pitchers, are going down with elbow injuries.

The diagnosis is almost always the same: A torn ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) in the player’s elbow.

The blame is almost always the same: Too many pitches thrown in a season, or throwing a curve ball at too young of an age, or too many innings pitched in a year, etc.

The solution is almost always the same: Reconstructive surgery (also known as Tommy John Surgery, named after the player who first had the procedure done).

Yet the cause is almost always missed:

- See more at: http://egoscue.com/blog/item/65-no-tommy-john-epidemic-egoscue#sthash.4aYgAGr1.dpuf

If you know me at all, then you know that I’m a baseball fan. I grew up playing the game as a kid, continued playing at Yale University, and now have the honor of coaching my two oldest boys as they learn to play the game.

But lately, I’ve noticed something very alarming about the game I love. There is an increasing number of elbow injuries popping up throughout the game. From Little League to the Major Leagues, players, and specifically pitchers, are going down with elbow injuries.

The diagnosis is almost always the same: A torn ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) in the player’s elbow.

The blame is almost always the same: Too many pitches thrown in a season, or throwing a curve ball at too young of an age, or too many innings pitched in a year, etc.

The solution is almost always the same: Reconstructive surgery (also known as Tommy John Surgery, named after the player who first had the procedure done).

Yet the cause is almost always missed:

- See more at: http://egoscue.com/blog/item/65-no-tommy-john-epidemic-egoscue#sthash.4aYgAGr1.dpuf

If you know me at all, then you know that I’m a baseball fan. I grew up playing the game as a kid, continued playing at Yale University, and now have the honor of coaching my two oldest boys as they learn to play the game.

But lately, I’ve noticed something very alarming about the game I love. There is an increasing number of elbow injuries popping up throughout the game. From Little League to the Major Leagues, players, and specifically pitchers, are going down with elbow injuries.

The diagnosis is almost always the same: A torn ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) in the player’s elbow.

The blame is almost always the same: Too many pitches thrown in a season, or throwing a curve ball at too young of an age, or too many innings pitched in a year, etc.

The solution is almost always the same: Reconstructive surgery (also known as Tommy John Surgery, named after the player who first had the procedure done).

Yet the cause is almost always missed...

READ MORE...

 

 

4. Fighting "Dysevolution"

 

We all know that things evolve. People, animals, we all adapt. We make the best of our surroundings. We tend to stick with things that we discover are of benefit to us, while we dump other ideas that have little-to-no impact on our lives. The wheel, for example, has proven pretty important. Google+, on the other hand...where did that go?

Adaptation is a part of life.

It's a part of being alive.

However, you might not have heard of the term "dysevolution." I certainly hadn't until recently, when I stumbled upon an article from Discover magazine. Harvard researcher (and all-around advocate of motion, specifically barefoot running) Daniel Lieberman suggests that modern-day humans are dysevolving, and at a fairly rapid rate.

READ MORE...

 

 

3. Drink More, Pee Less: The Key to Hydration

 

I’m guessing that title has you a little curious. I’m sure that you’re thinking that by drinking more, you’ll have to urinate more, but that’s not exactly true.

I’m sure that if you were to drink three large glasses of water right now you would, no doubt, have to run to the restroom within the hour. However, it’s not the water’s fault. It’s also not your bladder’s fault. I don’t think you have a “small” bladder or a bladder that has become “over stretched” and therefore can’t function correctly. I believe you’re dehydrated.

The majority of us are thinking about the bladder incorrectly. We are thinking of it as a bowl (a holding compartment) rather than a membrane (something that is designed to be saturated and lubricated).

Think about what happens when you pour water over a dry sponge...

READ MORE...

 

 

2. The Knee: Complex, Yet Simple

I love a good oxymoron. Phrases like "jumbo shrimp," "deafening silence," or the fact that we "park" in a driveway and "drive" on a parkway, can really get us thinking!

But what if we applied that link of thinking to the body? Is there a joint in the body that can be described oxymoronically? According to Pete Egoscue, there is a joint in the body that provides us with a bit of an anatomical oxymoron...

READ MORE...

 

 

1. Rory McIlroy's Biggest Injury Concern

 

Apparently the #1 ranked golfer in the world isn’t bulletproof.

On Sunday, the PGA’s top-ranked player, Rory McIlroy, posted this photo on his Instagram account, revealing that he had completely torn a ligament in his ankle while playing soccer with his buddies.

Of course it can be said, and it has been said, that his injury was “foolish” and “stupid.” Should the No. 1 golfer in the world be playing soccer? That’s debatable, and folks have weighed in on both ends of the spectrum. I think it’s safe to say that sarcasm and vitriol have ruled the Twitter-sphere over the last few days.

But, while everyone is worried about the short-term impact this injury will have on his World Golf Rankings, I think there is a far greater concern that Rory hasn’t even thought about...

READ MORE...

 

Again, THANK YOU for a great 2015! We're looking forward to bringing you more great content in 2016! 

If you have questions about specific symptoms or have blog post suggestions, contact us now!